Recipe: Chilli prawn and basil pasta

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INGREDIENTS

  • 20 (1kg) green medium king prawns
  • 375g Barilla Linguine
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small red onion, halved, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried chilli flakes
  • 400g can Italian cherry tomatoes in tomato juice
  • 1/2 cup Massel salt reduced chicken style liquid stock
  • 1 teaspoon caster sugar
  • 1/4 cup shredded fresh basil leaves
  • Fresh basil leaves, to serve

 

METHOD

  • Step 1 Peel and de-vein prawns, leaving tails intact.
  • Step 2 Cook pasta in a large saucepan of boiling salted water, following packet directions until tender. Drain.
  • Step 3  Meanwhile, heat oil in a large, deep frying pan over medium heat. Add onion. Cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes or until onion has softened. Add garlic and chilli. Cook for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add tomatoes, stock and sugar. Bring to a simmer. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add prawns. Simmer for 5 minutes or until prawns are cooked through and tomato mixture has thickened slightly. Stir in basil.
  • Step 4  Add pasta to tomato mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Serve sprinkled with basil leaves.

 

  Prawn is a common name for small       aquatic crustaceans with an exoskeleton and ten legs  some of which can be eaten.

The term “prawn is used particularly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Commonwealth nations, for large swimming crustaceans or shrimp, especially those with commercial significance in the fishing industry. Shrimp that fall in this category often belong to the suborde. In North America, the term is used less frequently, typically for freshwater shrimp. The terms shrimp and prawn themselves lack scientific standing. Over the years, the way shrimp and prawn are used has changed, and nowadays the terms are almost interchangeable.

In the United Kingdom, prawn is used more commonly on menus than shrimp, while the opposite is the case in the United States. The term prawn also loosely describes any large shrimp, especially those at 15 (or fewer) to the pound (such as king prawns or jumbo shrimp). According to the crustacean taxonomist Tin-Yam Chan, “The terms shrimp and prawn have no definite reference to any known taxonomic groups. Although the term shrimp is sometimes applied to smaller species, while prawn is more often used for larger forms, there is no clear distinction between both terms and their usage is often confused or even reverse in different countries or regions.”] Writing in 1980,  noted that the terms prawn and shrimp were used inconsistently “even within a single region”, generalising that larger species fished commercially were generally called shrimps in the United States, and prawns in other English-speaking countries, although not without exceptions.

bigclaw river shrimp. Prawns are sometimes said to be large shrimp or alternatively freshwater shrimp, but this large, freshwater creature is a caridean shrimp, and is rarely referred to as a prawn.

A lot of confusion surrounds the scope of the term shrimp. Part of the confusion originates with the association of smallness. That creates problems with shrimp-like species that are not small. The expression “jumbo shrimp” can be viewed as an oxymoron, a problem that doesn’t exist with the commercial designation “jumbo prawns”.

The term shrimp originated around the 14th century with the Middle English shrimpe, akin to the Middle Low German schrempen, and meaning to contract or wrinkle; and the Old Norse skorpna, meaning to shrivel up, or skreppa, meaning a thin person. It is not clear where the term prawn originated, but early forms of the word surfaced in England in the early 15th century as prayne, praine and prane. According to the linguist Anatoly Liberman it is unclear how shrimp, in English, came to be associated with small. “No Germanic language associates the shrimp with its size… The same holds for Romance… it remains unclear in what circumstances the name was applied to the crustacean.”

Taxonomic studies in Europe on shrimp and prawns were shaped by the common shrimp and the common prawn, both found in huge numbers along the European coastlines. The common shrimp, Crangon crangon was categorised in 1758 by , and the common prawn was categorised in. The common shrimp is a small burrowing species aligned with the notion of a shrimp as being something small, whereas the common prawn is much larger. The terms true shrimp or true prawn are sometimes used to mean what a particular person thinks is a shrimp or prawn. This varies with the person using the terms. But such terms are not normally used in the scientific literature, because the terms shrimp and prawn themselves lack scientific standing. Over the years the way shrimp and prawn are used has changed, and nowadays the terms are almost interchangeable. Although from time to time some biologists declare that certain common names should be confined to specific taxa, the popular use of these names seems to continue unchanged.

http://www.lankatimes.com.au

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